Hexagon Sewing Kit

A while ago I saw this beautiful hexagon sewing machine cover created by AnaZard and I knew that I had to make one myself. So I jumped right in. I printed hexies from a pattern shared by Geta Grama and then I spent some time (probably too much time) on youtube researching different techniques. I tried out a couple until I found one that I liked. But by the time I was ready to really get down and dirty with my hexies I was so frustrated by the unorganized mess they brought with them. Paper pieces, fabric, needle, finished hexies… sooo… I decided that I needed something to keep everything in check, and what better way than create something myself. I mean I can’t be the only one who creates a new project to solve the problem created by another project? Right? Right?

Anyway, let me present my Hexagon Sewing Kit!

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I have no idea where I’ve got the fabrics, they’ve been in my stash for about 7 years. The kit is inspired by the beautiful travel sewing kits that Amy from “lots of pink here!” has created. I kind of followed her travel sewing kit tutorial but made a few changes to suit my needs.

hexagon-sewing-kit-opened

So, when you open the kit this is what you see. It looks a bit crooked but it really isn’t, it’s just not very rigid and has already been put to great use. Opened up it measures about 24 cm wide and 20 cm high. And it fits everything I need to create hexies.

hexagon-sewing-kit-open-wide

Starting from the left upper corner there’s a little pocket for my embroidery scissors, it has a tiny snap button so there’s no risk of it falling out. Down to the bottom left corner is a pocket with a collapsible thread catcher (more info on that under the next photo). Then in the middle there’s a secured thread spool and below that is a felt spread with a couple of pins and needles. On the right side of the book is two pockets, one to keep all the fabric pieces and one for the templates. Finished hexies goes either in one of those pockets or gets to share pocket with the thread catcher.

hexagon-sewing-kit-trash

The collapsible thread catcher is just the neatest thing ever! I found this amazing tutorial on youtube: Collapsible Thread Catcher by Angie’s Bits & Pieces. I have to admit that I did one before this one that didn’t quite work out… I made the bottom pieces too large so it didn’t close properly. Lesson learned and for my second try the fit was perfect. There were some sizing issues with the side pieces but it worked out all right in the end I think.

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The thread spool is secured with the help of a safety pin. That way it’s easy to change the spool whenever I want to. At the moment I’m using Guterman black  polyester thread for my hexagons.

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And once the hexies are done I store them in ziplock bags. These are 1″ hexagons. So far I’ve done about 200 and I’m about 1/2 to 2/3 on my way… I think…

hexagon-sewing-kit-collected

And here’s one last image of the kit in all its glory. I love it! It makes the whole paper piecing process so much easier. I can grab the kit and know that I have everything I need with me, in one safe place.

Mystery Quilt

I’ve never done a mystery quilt before. Sure, I’ve been tempted but I never really understood why. I mean, why do something you don’t know if you’re going to like when it’s done? Well… I’ve finally figured it out. Because it’s FUN! The result isn’t the important thing here, it’s the process – the experience.

I’m not sure why I decided to join the Scrap Dance Mystery Quilt (From My Carolina Home) but before I knew it I was sucked and having a blast! The quilt along was in full swing when I joined but I’ve now caught up and eagerly awaiting the next installment. *so much fun*

STEP ONE

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Step 1 was to pick the fabric. Since I don’t have a stash of scrap fabrics I picked an old charm pack from moda, “Wildrose”. I love it. Initially I had planned to use several different white fabrics but in the end I used only one of them.

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I began cutting the pieces to the specified sizes. Since this is my first mystery quilt and my first patchwork in 7-ish years I decided to do the table topper. I forgot to take a picture of the all the half square triangles that were created.

STEP TWO

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These are the strips that came out of step two. I have no idea where this is going but I like it.

STEP THREE

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More strips :)

STEP FOUR

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And even more strips!

There are three steps left, the quilt is supposed to be finished in September. *gah* How on earth am I supposed to make it until then? I can’t wait to find out what it will look like when done. I’m having so much fun that I’m already planning on doing another mystery quilt once this is done!

New Start

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I can’t deny it any longer, the urge… at first it was barely a whisper somewhere deep down in my mind and I could pretend that I didn’t hear it. But the urge refused to be ignored and took hold and grew so large that finally I had to see the elephant in the room. Ok, I understand that this probably doesn’t make any sense to anyone but me… but I suppose that’s kind of the point. The urge to create is deeply personal and it can, and will, take many expressions if you let it. I can’t remember when it happened, maybe it was a gradual thing, but somewhere down the road I figured that one expression was more important than the rest. So I pushed all my energy towards this one thing and neglected the rest. All I can say is that I didn’t think it through… and I regret that. I can’t do anything to change the past, but in the future I can do my best to not put any parts of my creativity a corner.

What on earth am I on about? Well, what I’m trying to say is that I’ve finally listened to the creative elephant and picked up sewing again. I haven’t sewed anything in about 7 years and I haven’t made a garment in maybe 25 years? So, I decided to pick something easy. First up is a top, the free Sorbetto from Colette Patterns. I’ve printed the pattern, assembled it and cut it out. I’m taking it slow and easy, trying to not rush the process in a misguided attempt to make up for lost time. One step at a time… and maybe, just maybe I’ll be brave enough to acknowledge the other creative creatures that are lurking behind the sewing elephant.